Chinese New Year 4716 – Earth Dog

A new beginning of the Chinese New Year at CUI. On Thursday, February 15, the CUI celebrated a new beginning of the Chinese New Year. Students, teachers, managers and administrators of the...

A new beginning of the Chinese New Year at CUI.

On Thursday, February 15, the CUI celebrated a new beginning of the Chinese New Year. Students, teachers, managers and administrators of the Spanish for Chinese Program all offered together for the beginning of the year Earth Dog. Teresa Davis, Academic Director of the CUI, thanked everyone for the work of each day and wished a new year with much love and prosperity. The students of the program also thanked through the voice of Anthony Liu Dong all those who work every day in their learning of Spanish.

The Chinese New Year 農曆 新年, better known as the Spring Festival (春节, 春節, chūnjíe) in China or as Lunar New Year abroad, is the most important traditional holiday of the Chinese calendar year, celebrated also in other countries of the East of Asia.

Some of the traditions of this holiday:
The “red envelope” (红包, hóng bāo in Mandarin), also called Lai See (in Cantonese), consists in the delivery to children or relatives younger than one, as a wish of good luck, a red envelope containing a small amount of money.
The Chun Lian 春联, antithetical couplets, or couplets of the “spring festival”, as the new year in China is known, to differentiate it from the western one. In 春联 are written in good calligraphy, those characters related to abundance, happiness, prosperity … that will accompany the family in the coming year.
Guardians of the doors: representation of figures in defensive attitude, placed in the doors of the houses to defend the inhabitants of the possible entry of Nian.
The fish, yú 鱼, is homófono of the character yú 余 for abundance, reason why the placement of these animals in the houses is frequent. Red color will scare Nian away.
Placement of the character fú 福 (happiness) upside down. This is due to a play on words, since “upside down” in Chinese (倒, Pinyin: dào) is a homophone of “arrive” (到, Pinyin: dào) in the Chinese language. Thus “happiness (fú 福)” placed face down (dào se) is interpreted as “happiness (fú 福) has arrived (dào 到)”.
God of wealth, who presents himself with a beard and wearing a red tunic and a yellow coat on his back. It appears in the houses and distributes images, the residents of the houses give tips to this figure, all accompanied by drums and gongs.
Make typical dishes such as the Chinese ravioli 饺子 (jiǎozi) for the “old night” dinner.
Wu Shi 舞狮 or Lion Dance and “Wu Long 舞龙” or “Dragon Dance”, preserved since ancient times, originate from martial arts and serve to scare away evil spirits.

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